MODULE 6
Living, Breathing Bone

Location: Columbia Hotel, LONDON
Duration: 3 days
Price: £845 (non-residential)
Entry criteria: Module 2
Next delivery: 10—12 November 2017

(This course was formerly known as 'Neurocranium & Sacrum: Living Bone')

Everyday in practice we encounter patients who have suffered physical trauma in many forms and at different stages of their life and development. With highly developed palpatory skills, osteopaths have a unique insight into the effects of trauma.

In this module, we explore the effects of trauma with respect to the wonders of bone, sutures and joints throughout the body from their morphogenetic origins to their crystalline nature, from the macro-scale of biotensegrity in the pelvis to the quantum coherence of the specialised connective tissue itself.

Current research into the physiology of bone is examined and we discuss how this knowledge informs traditional osteopathic concepts laid down by the pioneers of our profession. The way bones function as 'springs' and how they dissipate forces within the connective tissue system is explored, enabling us to palpate clearly when trauma has disrupted this function. The role of the femur within the pelvis is considered to give an even more effective way of approaching low back and pelvic problems in clinic.

The biodynamics of the embryological metabolic fields in which the different types of bone are formed will be considered. There will be detailed study of each of the bones of the basicranium, their applied anatomy, relationships and clinical relevance. The different journey of each bone to their fully ossified form reveals and aids our understanding of the different qualities we feel in the structures under our hands. A study of growth and development of the cranium in the first ten years of life is essential knowledge for the treatment of children and also to understand the effects of past childhood trauma in adults.

Using these fluid models we study a range of techniques, including some intraoral releases, which have been handed down through osteopathic generations. When considered as specialized connective tissues with the similar dynamic, fluid, metabolic and communication properties as fascia, bones come alive under our hands.

Patterns of the cranial base, how they are reflected throughout the body via the connective tissue network and how we can use this understanding of patterns in clinical practice will be discussed.

As W.G.Sutherland said:

“What are bones but a different form of fluid?”

This course is full of applied principles and clinical relevance.

Course Content

Bony and sutural anatomy, applied anatomy, relationships and clinical relevance of all bones of the cranial base and vault: The effects of different types of trauma on involuntary motion of bones and sutures. Includes specific treatment techniques and approaches.

Physiology of bone as a specialised connective tissue:

What are bones but a different form of fluid? W G Sutherland
When considered as specialised connective tissues with the same dynamic fluid metabolic and communication properties as fascia, bones come alive under our hands. We will explore the way bones function as 'springs' and how they dissipate forces within the connective tissue system, which enables us to palpate clearly when trauma has disrupted this function.

  • Embryology of the bony cranium and sacrum. This helps us to understand the relationships of the cranial base and vault bones to the membranous and fluid systems of the cranium. Also why bones sometimes feel as though they function in separate parts long after they have ossified.
  • Growth and development of the cranium in the first 10 years of life, essential for the treatment of children but also to understand the effects of past childhood trauma in adults.
  • Patterns of the cranial base and how they are reflected throughout the body through the connective tissue network. How we can use this understanding of patterns in clinical practice.
  • The sacrum and pelvis: Have you ever thought of the femur as a spring? How do forces directed up through the femur become dissipated through the innominate and sacrum, and how can this be disturbed in trauma? Understanding this leads to a very effective approach to the treatment of low back and pelvic problems.

Course Format

The course format is a balance of lectures and small group tutorials and practicals. The 1:4 tutor groups enable you to benefit directly from the clinical expertise of your tutor, and to discuss with colleagues. You will directly handle replica disarticulated bones, and have the opportunity to compare these to real bone specimens.

In the practicals, our tutors are experts at meeting individual needs and gently opening up awareness to new concepts and experiences. We explore the fine balance between holding enough space for the mechanism to express and guide the treatment process, with the need for accurate and detailed local palpation.

Excellent course notes are provided.

Course Details

This course is run approximately once every 2 years in the UK.

FAQs

What next?

Join the SCCO Mentoring Scheme A variety of opportunities to meet with like minded colleagues, or work with experienced osteopaths in their practice using this approach.

Write an assignment: The SCCO membership pathway requires 3 written case study assignments. Writing this assignment is an excellent way of reviewing and consolidating your learning from the course.

Refresher Day: Bring your questions and experiences or difficulties to share with your colleagues and experienced tutors on a refresher day. An excellent way of consolidating your learning from the course.

Other courses: In Reciprocal Tension links very well with this course, exploring the interconnectedness of the connective tissue system of the body. Or choose another modular course to continue your journey on the SCCO membership pathway.